k y m a • t w e a k y — the kyma collective || view the current website || February 2015 Archive

/ WebHome / WebHome / Know.KymaXDownloads

Search


Know Section


Problems & Sol'ns
Download Updates

Home 
Topics 
More... 

All Sections


Products
Order
Company
Community
Share
Learn

Login / Register 
Change password
Forgot password?

Symbolic Sound


Home
Kyma Forum
Eighth Nerve

TWiki Links


twiki.org

Download the Latest Release of the Kyma X Software

ALERT! The updates on this page can be used only in conjunction with a complete installation of Kyma X from a Kyma X CD-ROM. Attempting to use an update without a pre-existing install could result in data loss.

PICK NOTE: When you click the link to download the software, you may be asked to provide a name and password. Use the same name and password that you use to log into kyma•tweaky.

Kyma X.90 (6.90f0) - 16 December 2014 NEW

Download Instructions for Macintosh

Download the Kyma X Update ZIP Archive (~38 megabytes). The resulting file will automatically expand into a folder containing the new Kyma X application. Move the Kyma X file in the folder into your current Kyma folder, replacing your current copy of Kyma X. This update includes an update to the Paca(rana) firmware. Please turn off or disconnect all other FireWire devices before proceeding with the firmware update.

After you have installed the update and started Kyma, be sure to download the new examples, documentation, and supporting files by selecting Check for updates to the Kyma Sound Library from the Help menu.

PICK NOTE: If your Macintosh is running OS X 10.4, please make sure that you have installed all of the security updates available from Apple (use Software Update... from the Apple menu to install them). Kyma will not start if the security updates are not installed.

Download the previous update: Kyma X.89 (6.89)

Download Instructions for Windows

Download the Kyma X Update ZIP Archive (~38 megabytes). Double-clicking on the resulting file in Windows Explorer (or My Computer) will automatically expand the file into a folder containing the new Kyma X application. First, delete your current Kyma X.app folder (inside your Kyma folder; then, move the new Kyma X.app folder in the expanded folder into your current Kyma folder. This update includes an update to the Paca(rana) firmware. Please turn off or disconnect all other FireWire devices before proceeding with the firmware update. See the notes below about updating your desktop shortcut to start Kyma.

After you have installed the update and started Kyma, be sure to download the new examples, documentation, and supporting files by selecting Check for updates to the Kyma Sound Library from the Help menu.

Download the previous update: Kyma X.89 (6.89)

Extra Windows Installation Steps


What's New in Kyma X.90 (6.90f0) - 16 December 2014


What's New in Kyma X.89 (6.89f4) - 30 November 2014

What's New in Kyma X.89 (6.89f0) - 16 August 2014

What's New in Kyma X.88 (6.88f5) - 17 February 2014

What's New in Kyma X.88 (6.88f4) - 27 January 2014

What's New in Kyma X.88 (6.88f3) - 12 January 2014

What's New in Kyma X.88 (6.88f1) - 03 January 2014

What's New in Kyma X.88 (6.88f0) - 26 October 2013

What's New in Kyma X.87f6 (6.87f6) - 5 August 2013

What's New in Kyma X.87f5 (6.87f5) - 22 June 2013

What's New in Kyma X.87f4 (6.87f4) - 14 May 2013

What's New in Kyma X.87f2 (6.87f2) - 7 March 2013

What's New in Kyma X.87f1 (6.87f1) - 24 February 2013

What's New in Kyma X.87 (6.87) - 13 February 2013

What's New in Kyma X.86 (6.86) - 31 December 2012


What's New in Kyma X.85 (6.85f3) - 18 October 2012

What's New in Kyma X.85 (6.85f2) - 29 September 2012

What's New in Kyma X.85 (6.85f1) - 09 September 2012

What's New in Kyma X.85 (6.85f0) - 31 August 2012

What's New in Kyma X.84 (6.84f0) - 4 July 2012

What's New in Kyma X.83 (6.83f0) - 19 May 2012

* Restored the proper operation of !TimingClock (it was accidentally broken by version 6.82)

What's New in Kyma X.82 (6.82f12) - 14 May 2012

What's New in Kyma X.82 (6.82f11) - 29 March 2012

What's New in Kyma X.82 (6.82f9) - 12 March 2012

What's New in Kyma X.82 (6.82f7) - 21 February 2012

What's New in Kyma X.82 (6.82f6) - 26 January 2012

What's New in Kyma X.82 (6.82) - 21 November 2011

Video: What's New in Kyma X.82 from KISS2011

Application Changes

Kyma Sound Library & File updates

Documentation

Interface

Menus

Paca(rana) Firmware Changes

Analysis File Changes

Sound Changes

CapyTalk and Smalltalk Changes

or

Timeline Changes

Spectrum Editor Changes

TAU Editor Changes

Sample Editor Changes

Class Editor Changes

VCS

Keyboards, controllers & MIDI

New Sounds

Unfortunately some of the new Sounds are so resource-intensive that they could be implemented only on the newer hardware (Paca and Pacarana) and it was not possible to implement them on the older Capybara-320.

New Prototypes

New Tools

Sound Parameter Fields

Kyma Control on iPad

Miscellaneous Changes & Fixes


What's New in Kyma X.81 (6.81) - 19 June 2011

What's New in Kyma X.80 (6.80) - 11 April 2011

What's New in Kyma X.79 (6.79) - 6 February 2011

What's New in Kyma X.78 (6.78) - 6 January 2011

Windows Installation

Changes to the Kyma X Installation Guide for Windows XP and newer (older versions of Windows are no longer supported):

Interface

New Sounds

New CapyTalk or Smalltalk

'alien threat.aif' fileDuration

<aFileName> liveLoopingTimeIndexWithGate: aGate start: aStart end: anEnd startLoop: loopStart endLoop: loopEnd rate: aRate

or

<aFileName> markerLoopingTimeIndexWithGate: gate atkScale: scaleAtkDur susScale: scaleSusDur relScale: scaleRelDur

Miscellaneous Fixes


What's New in Kyma X.77 (6.77) - 15 September 2010

What's New in Kyma X.76 (6.76) - 29 July 2010

What's New in Kyma X.75 (6.75) - 24 June 2010

What's New in Kyma X.74 (6.74) - 28 February 2010

What's New in Kyma X.73 (6.73) - 21 December 2009

What's New in Kyma X.72 (6.72) - 19 November 2009

'flamingos s.L.psi' fileNamesOnSameChannelInSameFolder

What's New in Kyma X.71 (6.71) - 1 November 2009

On Paca(rana):

What's New in Kyma X.70 (6.70) - 16 October 2009

ALERT! Kyma X 6.70 is not recommended for Wormhole users (but 6.71 is fine).

What's New in Kyma X.69 (6.69) - 19 September 2009

What's New in Kyma X.68 (6.68) - 4 August 2009

What's New in Kyma X.67 (6.67) - 20 July 2009

What's New in Kyma X.66 (6.66) - 13 July 2009

What's New in Kyma X.64 (6.64) - 31 May 2009

What's New in Kyma X.63 (6.63) - 25 May 2009

What's New in Kyma X.62 (6.62) - 7 May 2009

What's New in Kyma X.60 (6.60) - 1 April 2009

What's New in Kyma X.59 (6.59) - 22 February 2009

What's New in Kyma X.58 (6.58) - 8 February 2009

What's New in Kyma X.57 (6.57) - 2 February 2009

What's New in Kyma X.56 2 (6.56 2) - 26 January 2009

What's New in Kyma X.54 (6.54) - 30 July 2008

SlipStick can be used for generating a wide range of control signals or audio signals — from creaking sound effects to keyboard-controlled oscillators. It makes an interesting excitation signal and, because it is nonlinear, it can also be used as an audio distortion effect. SlipStick is a physical model of an object being dragged across a surface by a control point at the end of a spring. Initially, the object is sticking to the surface due to the force of gravity pushing down on it. As you increase the distance between your control position and the position of the object, you also increase the tension of the spring which increases the pull or the force on the object at right angles to the downward force of gravity. Once the force due to the spring exceeds the force due to gravity, the object starts sliding along the surface. As it does so, it compresses the spring and which pushes back in the other direction. If there is very low slip friction, the object may start to oscillate back and forth. You specify the (changing) position of the control, friction when the object is stationary, friction when the object is sliding, the stiffness of the spring, the frequency of oscillation, and the decay time of any oscillations with nonzero slip friction.

Parameter Description
ControlPosition Typically this is a controller input. This is where you are trying to drag the object which is at the end of a spring. It can also be an audio rate input if you paste a Sound in the field and remove the 'L' that automatically appears after it.
Frequency If SlipFriction is low or zero, the system can go into oscillations at this frequency.
Stiffness The stiffness of the spring affects how quickly the object will slide to its new position. Think of the difference between a very stiff spring and a spring that is more relaxed. For low stiffness values, it takes bigger changes in ControlPosition before the object breaks free of gravity and starts sliding. If you have a periodic ControlPosition input, the response of the object is less regular for low spring stiffness.
Decay For settings that produce oscillations, Decay controls how much time it takes for the oscillations to die out.
StickFriction Friction between the object and the surface when the object is sticking on the surface.
SlipFriction Friction between the object and the surface while the object is sliding along the surface.
Velocity To output the velocity of the object in both channels, check this box. (To output the velocity on the left channel and the spring tension on the right channel, check both boxes).
Stretch To output the tension or stretching of the spring on both channels, check this box. (To output the velocity on the left channel and the spring tension on the right channel, check both boxes).
Level Controls the amplitude of the output signal.
TimeConstant Use TimeConstant to smooth out any steps or unevenness in the ControlPosition input (for example, if you supplying the ControlPosition by hand using a physical controller). The shorter the TimeConstant, the faster the actual ControlPosition reaches the desired ControlPosition. Longer TimeConstants give you smoother (but more sluggish) changes in ControlPosition.
Reset To reset the object and spring to their original states, change this value from 0 to 1 and then back to 0 (for example, using !Trigger).
SetReference Use this field to give an additional push to an object that is already in motion (imagine adding an extra push to an already spinning roulette wheel). This field resets the reference position to the current control position, so you can give the object another push from its current (rather than original) position.

What's New in Kyma X.53 (6.53) - 02 February 2008

'aFile.mid' midiFileBPM
1 bpm: !BPM dutyCycle: !duty

What's New in Kyma X.52 (6.52) - 06 January 2008

What's New in Kyma X.51 (6.51) - 21 December 2007

What's New in Kyma X.50 (6.50) - 25 November 2007

What's New in Kyma X.49 (6.49) - 07 November 2007

What's New in Kyma X.48 (6.48) - 28 October 2007

What's New in Kyma X.47 (6.47) - 9 October 2007

Please download the folder with the examples and new samples: Kyma X.47 Examples (the samples are required by new Prototypes). You can use Edit>Preferences and Speaker Placement to set up your system to output on multiple channels.

To stop recording, use Ctrl+K. The Recording dialog no longer prompts you for the duration of the recording. The only way to stop the recording is Ctrl+K. To record a file with a precise duration, put the Sound to be recorded in a SetDuration.

NB: If any problems with recording to disk, you can switch to the old way of doing things by choosing Preferences from the Edit menu, click the Miscellaneous button, and check the box Use Old Recording Dialogs.

Example: In a signal that is to be replicated, if you would like to assign each of the replicated copies to a different position in the stereo field, you can use (as the left parameter of an Attenuator): (?VoiceNumber - 1 / (?NumberVoices - 1)) asLeftPan) and in the right: (?VoiceNumber - 1 / (?NumberVoices - 1)) asLeftPan)

Stereoizer Converts a mono processing Sound into a stereo processor with independent controls for left and right channels (labelled with prefix(es) and/or suffix(es)). If there are any controls that should be shared between the two channels, add them to the DoNotChange list. The SharedSounds are any Sounds in the signal flow graph that should be shared between right and left channels. Typically, the SharedSounds act as the source(s) and the chain of modules between the SharedSounds and the output act as the processing, with independent controls on the processing for the left and the right channels. If the SharedSounds have stereo outputs (for example a GrainCloud? or a StereoSample?), each channel is routed through its own chain of processing modules to maintain left/right separation. Stereoizer is also a handy way to process just the left or just the right channel of a stereo Sound. For example, to process the right channel ONLY, check the LeftBypass box.

Surroundifier Creates a pseudo-surround mix by splitting a stereo input into L, R, LS, RS, C, and LFE, routed to output channels 1-6, each with its own level control. Each channel is (optionally) processed through its own independently controlled copy of the ReplicatedSound (controls are labelled with prefixes and/or suffixes). For example, if the ReplicatedSound is a high pass filter, each output channel could have its own cutoff frequency (or could bypass the filtering altogether). On the subwoofer channel 6 you hear the first SharedSound plus a controllable amount of SubBass distortion subharmonics.

GestosoMidSideEncoderDecoder Based on a Sound and icon by JesusGestoso, the MidSideEncoderDecoder encodes a stereo input into two parts: Mid (the part that appears in the middle of the stereo image because it is the same in the left and right speakers) and Side (the part that appears on the sides of the stereo image because it differs between left and right speakers). You can apply processing to the Side, the Mid, or both (with independent controls on Mid and Side processing) prior to recombining Mid and Side to form the left and right channels of a standard stereo signal. If you have MS-encoded recordings (or an MS-encoding microphone) you can use this Sound to process decode in real time by checking the SkipEncoding box.

MonoToMultichannel Converts a mono processing chain into multiple independent chains with independent controls, one for each of the channels checked with checkboxes. Each of the replicated controls can be identified with a Prefix and/or a Suffix. Use the incrementPrefix/Suffix checkboxes to increment any numerals that appear in the prefix or suffix. To give each channel's replicant a different prefix or suffix, enter an array of strings in the Prefix and/or Suffix array fields. Controls that should be shared between the two channels can be added to the DoNotChange list. The SharedSounds are any Sounds in the signal flow graph that should be shared by all channels. Typically, the SharedSounds act as the source(s) and the chain of modules between the SharedSounds and the output act as the processing, with independent controls on the processing for each output channel.

Prefixer Adds an ID as either a prefix or suffix to any hot values in Sounds to the left of the Prefixer in the signal flow graph. By default, the ID is the name of the Input, or you can override the default by entering a different identifier in the ID field. A Prefixer is useful for maintaining separate sets of controls for each Sound when you combine two or more Sounds. If you do not use Prefixers the controls of combined Sounds are intermingled in the VCS alphabetically, and any parameters with shared names are controlled by a single controller.) Use the DoNotChange field for specifying the names of hot values that should NOT have the ID prefix of suffix. For example, to control over the !Frequency of all Sounds in a Mixer using a single VCS fader, add !Frequency to the DoNotChange list.

MultichannelPan A MultichannelPan uses the Timeline's panning algorithm plus an option for independently controlled processing on each output channel. Given the Speaker Placement (specified in Edit>Preferences), the SharedSound can be panned to any Angle on a circle surrounding the listener and adjusted to any Radius or distance from the listener. The processing (defined as a portion of the signal chain from just to the right of the SharedSound? through to the output) is replicated for each position. The source (the SharedSound) is not replicated but is panned through each of the fixed-position copies of the processing chain. For simple panning without independently controlled processing chains in each channel, Ctrl+Drag the exact same Sound into both the SharedSound and the ReplicatedSound parameter fields.

MultichannelMixer A Mixer that accepts multichannel inputs. Each of the Inputs has an overall Level. The output of channel 1 is the sum of the Inputs' channel 1 outputs. The output of channel 2 is the sum of the Inputs' channel 2s, etc. Each Input has an overall amplitude control specified n the Levels field.

SelectableAudioInput Select any input channel from among all of the available input channels. The output of this Sound is mono. The Channel parameter is an integer in the range from 1 to the number of input channels. You can change this while the Sound is playing.

SelectableAudioOutput Routes its mono Input Sound to any one of the output channels by number. Channel is an integer in the range from 1 to the number of output channels. You can change this while the Sound is playing.

SelectableSound Selects one of its Input Sounds. The Inputs are arranged in order from left to right, top to bottom and numbered from 1 to the total number of Inputs. The Selection parameter is an integer corresponding to the position number of the selected Sound.

SplitSurroundFilePlayer Plays back previously-recorded files on multiple channels for 7.1 Surround (.L .R .LS .RS .C .LFE .LC .RC), 5.1 Surround (.L .R .LS .RS .C .LFE), Quadraphonic (.L .R .LS .RS), or Cinema Stereo (.L .R .C), as long as you have followed the file naming convention, aFileName.C.aif, and as long as you have saved the related files within the same folder. Any missing files will result in the corresponding files being silent during the playback. You can select whether to read the files from RAM or to stream them directly off the disk. NOTE: This Sound, as other multichannel output Sounds, can only be used as the last (rightmost) Sound in a chain, just prior to the output.

SplitSurroundSample Like SplitSurroundFilePlayer except it allows for live loop point adjustment, and the samples must fit into RAM

What's New in Kyma X.46 (6.46) - 15 July 2007

What's New in Kyma X.45 (6.45) - 10 June 2007

All the new features are illustrated in Kyma X.45 Examples.

Returns the power of two that is closest to the value of the receiver (for negative numbers it finds the nearest power of two for the magnitude and keeps the sign the same), for example:

1.5 closestPowerOfTwo   = 2.0d
5 closestPowerOfTwo     = 4.0d
-10 closestPowerOfTwo   =  -8.0d 

This expression is useful for retriggering a loop every bar-length number of beats. It is similar to the expression

(1 bpm: !BPM) triggerEvery: !Beats

except that triggerEverySampled: will evaluate the expression computing the number of beats only when the result of the entire expression is true (i.e., only on a trigger) and it will hold that value for the rest of the time. This is useful for completing a full loop before allowing a change to take place in the number of beats per bar.

Assuming a samples file is a repeating loop and you know the number of beats in the loop, you can ask for its tempo. For example, 'rustDrum130.aif' bpmForBeats: 8 = 129.938

Again assuming that a samples file is a loop, this expression returns the multiple of the sample's natural tempo that is closest to another tempo. For example,

'rustDrum130.aif' closestBPMTo: 60 forBeats: 8 = 64.969184875488d 'rustDrum130.aif' closestBPMTo: 300 forBeats: 8 = 259.87673950195d

A shortcut that is the same as bpmForBeats: but assumes that there are 8 beats.

'aFIleName' fileNamesOfSameTypeInSameFolder

This is helpful for a Sound like MultiSample when you would like a group of filenames from a folder but some of the files in that folder are text files or subfolders. This will return only the files that have the same number of channels as the argument; this is handy since the MultiSample expects all of its files to be either stereo or mono and cannot accomodate a mix of the two.

{!Fader1 copies: 10}

results in:

#(!Fader01 !Fader02 !Fader03 !Fader04 !Fader05 !Fader06 !Fader07 !Fader08 !Fader09 !Fader10)

and

{!Fader100 copies: 4}

is:

#(!Fader100 !Fader101 !Fader102 !Fader103 )

'aSpectrum.spc' fileNamesOfSameTypeInSameFolder

returns a collection of strings corresponding to the names of the files in the same folder as 'aSpectrum.spc' which are of the same type (.spc or a spectrum file).

The labels can be numeric (the value at each tick), pitches (the octave and pitch class associated with a notenumber value), a list (arbitrary list of string labels, one per line), or code (Smalltalk code that returns a collection of strings to be used as the labels).

You can generate the labels (using numeric, code, or pitch) and subsequently switch to list so you can edit the list by hand. To reset the edited labels, edit the list and erase everything so you have an empty list.

What's New in Kyma X.44 (6.44) - 29 March 2007

What's New in Kyma X.43 (6.43) - 24 March 2007

aBooleanExp trueForLast: nbrMeasurements

"Receiver is a Boolean expression evaluated once per millisecond. If it has been true (nonzero) for the last nbrMeasurements (milliseconds), return a 1. Else return 0. Useful for testing that some characteristics of a live controller remain true for a given number of milliseconds (e.g. stability)."

EXAMPLE: ((!PenZ - 0.2) abs lt: 0.01) trueForLast: 20

Would be true (1) as long as you maintain the value of !PenZ within the range between 0.19 to 0.21 for at least the past 20 milliseconds.

anExpr sameForLast: nbrMeasurements tolerance: epsilon

"Receiver is a gate. During the interval of time that self is true (nonzero), returns a new value whenever anExpr is evaluated. If anExpr equals its previous two measured values, return a 1. Else return 0. Useful for detecting quick changes in a live controller."

EXAMPLE: !PenZ sameForLast: 1 tolerance: 0.5 For small, smooth changes in the pen value, this will be true. However, if the value change jumps 0.5 between updates, the expression becomes false (0).

EXAMPLE2: !AmpFollower sameForLast: 1 tolerance: !Steepness If you copy/paste an AmplitudeFollower into this expression, you could use it to detect when the onset of a live input was faster (steeper slope) than a given value.

aTrig trueIf: anExpr sameForLast: nbrReps

"Receiver is treated as a 1 ms long trigger. If self becomes true and anExpr equals the value it had the last nbrReps times it was triggered, return a 1. Else return 0. Useful for testing for a given number of repetitions."

EXAMPLE: !KeyDown trueIf: !KeyNumber sameForLast: 2

The value is 0 the first two times you play a new pitch on keyboard; then it is 1 for each subsequent keydown repeating that same pitch

anExpr accumulate

"Receiver is an expression evaluating to a positive or negative increment added to the expression each millisecond. This expression returns a value in the range of 0 to 1, initial value is 0.5. "

anExpr accumulateIf: aBooleanExpr

"Receiver is a positive or negative increment added ONCE to the expression when triggered by aBooleanExpr. It cannot be incremented again until aBooleanExpr returns to 0 first. This expression returns a value in the range of 0 to 1, initial value is 0.5. "

anExpr accumulateIf: aBooleanExpr initialValue: initVal reset: reset

"Receiver is a positive or negative increment added ONCE to the expression when triggered by aBooleanExpr. It cannot be incremented again until aBooleanExpr returns to 0 first. This expression returns a value in the range of 0 to 1, initial value is initVal. Slam back to initVal while reset is true. "

anExpr accumulateWhile: aBooleanExpr

"Receiver is a positive or negative increment added to the expression each millisecond for as long as aBooleanExpr is true. This expression returns a value in the range of 0 to 1, initial value is 0.5. "

anExpr accumulateWhile: aBooleanExpr initialValue: initVal reset: reset

"Receiver is a positive or negative increment added to the expression each millisecond for as long as aBooleanExpr is true. This expression returns a value in the range of 0 to 1, initial value is initVal. Slam back to initVal while reset is true. "

What's New in Kyma X.42 (6.42) - 25 February 2007

What's New in Kyma X.41 (6.41) - 06 December 2006

What's New in Kyma X.4 (6.4) - 18 October 2006

{1 to: 16 collect: [:i | !Freq * i]}

What's New in Kyma X.39 (6.39) - 28 September 2006

What's New in Kyma X.38 (6.38) - 08 September 2006

What's New in Kyma X.37.5 (6.37.5) - 22 July 2006

What's New in Kyma X.37 (6.37) - 18 July 2006

What's New in Kyma X.36 (6.36) - 3 July 2006

What's New in Kyma X.35 (6.35) - 18 June 2006

What's New in Kyma X.34 (6.34) - 9 June 2006

What's New in Kyma X.33 (6.33) - 16 April 2006

Included in this download is a copy of rimembriancora.aif that had been omitted from the Kyma installation. Please move this file into the Speech folder in the Samples folder of the Kyma folder.

What's New in Kyma X.32 (6.32) - 13 March 2006

What's New in Kyma X.30 (6.30) - 14 February 2006

Imagine that you could push, pull and reshape the amplitude, frequency, and formant envelopes of your sounds using the mouse, Wacom pen, or arrow keys. The Tau provides a new way to resynthesize, morph, and transmogrify your sounds in Kyma.

The Tau can assist you in aligning the timing, frequency, amplitude and formant envelopes of several files for synchronization, morphing or cross-synthesis. Needless to say, the Tau is also an open invitation to distort and deform your sounds in new and entertainingly nonconformist ways!

Read more about the Tau here. Be sure to download the additional files needed for this release.

What's New in Kyma X.26 (6.26) - 3 February 2006

What's New in Kyma X.25 (6.25) - 20 January 2006

What's New in Kyma X.24 (6.24) - 31 December 2005

What's New in Kyma X.23 (6.23) - 23 December 2005

What's New in Kyma X.22 (6.22) - 25 August 2005

What's New in Kyma X.21 (6.21) - 16 July 2005

What's New in Kyma X.2 (6.20) - 4 July 2005

What's New in Kyma X.195 (6.195) - 23 June 2005

What's New in Kyma X.19 (6.19) - 1 June 2005

0.1 s tick
would generate a trigger once every tenth of a second,
!Duration s tick
would generate a trigger once every variable number of seconds, and
1 s randExp s tick
would generate a trigger at random intervals ranging between 0 and 24 seconds apart.

What's New in Kyma X.18 (6.18) - 12 May 2005

What's New in Kyma X.17 (6.17) - 26 April 2005

!Gate alignWith: (1 bpm: !BPM)

{'bell.aif' sampleFileNamesInSameFolder}

What's New in Kyma X.16 - 09 April 2005

What's New in Kyma X.15 - 21 March 2005

What's New in Kyma X.14 - 8 February 2005

What's New in Kyma X.13 - 27 January 2005

What's New in Kyma X.12 - 23 January 2005

What's New in Kyma X.11 - 7 January 2005

What's New in Kyma X.1 - 31 December 2004

What's New in Kyma X.09 - 05 August 2004

What's New in Kyma X.08 - 15 June 2004

What's New in Kyma X.07 - 27 May 2004

What's New in Kyma X.06 - 11 Feb 2004

What's New in Kyma X.05 - 22 Jan 2004

What's New in Kyma X.04 - 27 Oct 2003

What's New in Kyma X.03 - 26 Oct 2003

What's New in Kyma X.02 - 23 Oct 2003

What's New in Kyma X.01 - 19 Oct 2003

 
 
© 2003-2014 by the contributing authors. / You are TWikiGuest